The home of Critic, Writer and Film-maker: Liam Walters

Chi’s Sweet Home


Written By: Hannah Smith

chiCats are evil – the ‘gangsters of the animal world’, as some writer once said it in some book. They come out at night, preying on those smaller and weaker than them, playing with their food before they eat it. They fight each other to the death over territory and food. They often disappear mysteriously and never return. When the sun comes up, they sit in the comfiest chair of your house, they’re served meat and fish in bowls and are lavished in attention. Chi’s Sweet Home, however, is very much the antithesis of that. It’s a manga-turned-anime about a small kitten named Chi who is separated from her mother and taken in by a young family. Much hilarity and mischief ensues.

One of the great things about this anime is the music; this consists of two or three main songs that are repeated throughout the anime in even amounts. These represent Chi’s moods. The two songs that are most memorable are the one that plays when Chi is up to mischief, and the song which plays when Chi is sad. The music is the driving force behind the show; for instance, I watched the first episode with subtitles and no sound and was a little confused as to what was going on, but watched again with sound and cried like a baby. These songs are very, very emotive, and say just as much as Chi does.

Another really endearing thing about this anime is the art style. The human beings in this anime are drawn very simply, with button eyes and small mouths, but surprisingly detailed clothing. This format works very well for the series> An overly analytical person might say the clothing is more detailed than the faces because it is closer to Chi’s line of sight, but that’s up for debate. Chi is also drawn quite simply, with very, very large eyes and head.

Up to this point, I’ve been doing nothing but praising Chi’s Sweet Home no end, but it has to be said that this series is not for everyone; in fact, if you are a rather burly straight man above the age of fifteen, you would probably rather stick samurai swords into various bodily orifices than watch this anime, seeing as its central character is a kitten, and almost all of the episodes contain a certain amount of ‘kawaii.’

It can also be said for this anime that, along with the episodes, the story arcs are very short – the episodes are three minutes long including opening credits, and the arcs achieve an average two episodes, sometimes only one or rarely three. This means if you’re one of those people who has a job, demanding partner, or ADHD (or all three if you’re REALLY hardcore), it’s easy enough to keep track of this anime and have time to watch it.

This is a great show if you’re looking for something lighthearted and you don’t mind cute kittens. Just keep an eye out for those weepy moments, and be sure to bookmark where you are. I always forget when I’ve watched an episode and end up viewing the same one about twelve times. Oh, and one more thing: watch where you put that samurai sword.

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